Monday, August 3, 2015

Missile-Age Minutemen

Missile-Age Minutemen It was not until World War II that the technology of using rockets and missiles in warfare became firmly established. The Cold War, a term used to describe the hostile relations between communist and non-communist countries, greatly accelerated missile and rocket technology. Coastal defenses during this period largely depended on the Nike antiaircraft missile system. The four sites on Oʻahu were at Dillingham Air Force Base in Mokuleʻia (Kawaihāpai;) Kahuku Army Training Area near Mt Kawela; Bellows Air Force Station at Waimanalo and Barbers Pt (Palehua,) on the southwestern portion of the Waianae Mountain Range.

Click link below for more images and information:
http://imagesofoldhawaii.com/missile-age-minutemen/

Sunday, August 2, 2015

How Did The Aliʻi Feel?

How Did The Aliʻi Feel? My recent post concerning nationality versus race in the “ongoing claims and discussions about restoring the Hawaiian Government that was deposed on January 17, 1893” has, unfortunately, produced some nasty remarks (however, I will note, some were very positive.) The historical record is clear – from Kamehameha I to Liliʻuokalani, the aliʻi befriended, sought counsel and even married Caucasians and other foreigners. Following contact, Caucasians were actively involved with all of the aliʻi – they served as personal and significant advisors to the aliʻi. Aliʻi sought their advice and put them in places of importance – many of these were missionaries.

Click link below for more images and information:
http://imagesofoldhawaii.com/how-did-the-ali%ca%bbi-feel/

Saturday, August 1, 2015

Kahahawai

Kahahawai When war broke out between Kalaniʻōpuʻu of Hawaiʻi Island and Kahekili in 1779, Kahahana had come to the aid of Kahekili. In a meeting between Kahahana and Kahekili, Kahekili deceived Kahahana. Kahekili prepared for an invasion against Oʻahu and Kahahana. He called on Kahahawai, his special friend, strategist and war chief. A decisive battle in the war between Kahekili and Kahahana took place near Kolekole Pass. Kahahawai’s warriors lit their torches and moved away (the enemies thought they had gone off to sleep.) But Kahahawai and his men arose and destroyed Kahahana’s warriors.

Click link below for more images and information:
http://imagesofoldhawaii.com/kahahawai/

Friday, July 31, 2015

It’s About Nationality, Not Race

It’s About Nationality, Not Race The Hawaiian nation was overthrown in 1893 … not the Hawaiian race (it was a constitutional monarchy, not race-limited.) Yet, to date, apparently, the only people permitted to exercise their rights related to discussions on restoration, reparation, sovereignty, independence, etc related to the Hawaiian nation have been those of one race, the native Hawaiians. However, all Hawaiian citizens lost their nation in 1893 … Hawai‘i was built up of many racial ethnic extractions, but they all came under one nationality, called a Hawaiian citizen or subject, not just those who lived in the Islands prior to 1778. Why aren’t all Hawaiian citizens included in the recognition and sovereignty discussions and decisions today?

Click link below for more images and information:
http://imagesofoldhawaii.com/its-about-nationality-not-race/

Thursday, July 30, 2015

It’s About Nationality, Not Race

It’s About Nationality, Not Race The Hawaiian nation was overthrown in 1893 … not the Hawaiian race (it was a constitutional monarchy, not race-limited.) Yet, to date, apparently, the only people permitted to exercise their rights related to discussions on restoration, reparation, sovereignty, independence, etc related to the Hawaiian nation have been those of one race, the native Hawaiians. However, all Hawaiian citizens lost their nation in 1893 … Hawai‘i was built up of many racial ethnic extractions, but they all came under one nationality, called a Hawaiian citizen or subject, not just those who lived in the Islands prior to 1778. Why aren’t all Hawaiian citizens included in the recognition and sovereignty discussions today?

Click link below for more images and information:
http://imagesofoldhawaii.com/its-about-nationality-not-race/

Drinking Smoke

Drinking Smoke Nicotiana tabacum was unknown in Europe when Christopher Columbus crossed the Atlantic. There he saw both men and women who ‘drank’ (or inhaled) the smoke of rolls of burning leaves. In the Islands, tobacco cultivation dates at least to 1809, when Archibald Campbell observed ‘smoking tobacco is another luxury of which the natives are very fond.' Don Francisco de Paula Marin planted tobacco on January 11, 1813. Six years later, the use of tobacco was widespread. Chiefs, as well as their servants would pass a single pipe from one person to another. The Islands grew “four different kinds of tobacco in our field, and as some of them are much better than others”.

Click link below for more images and information:
http://imagesofoldhawaii.com/drinking-smoke/

Wednesday, July 29, 2015

Tracks

Tracks Until the mid-1800s, Hawaiʻi overland travel was predominantly by foot and followed traditional trails; people walked, or rode horses or used personal carts/buggies. It wasn't until 1868, that horse-drawn carts became the first public transit service. In 1900, the Tramway was taken over by the Honolulu Rapid Transit & Land Co (HRT.) In 1888, the legislature gave Dillingham an exclusive franchise “for construction and operation on the Island of O‘ahu a steam railroad ... for the carriage of passengers and freight.” He started O`ahu Railway & Land Co (OR&L.) In 1900, an electric trolley (tram line) was put into operation in Honolulu, and then in 1902, a tram line was built to connect Waikīkī and downtown Honolulu. In 1915, the streetcars were replaced completely by buses (first gasoline and later diesel buses.)

Click link below for more images and information:
http://imagesofoldhawaii.com/tracks/